Preschool Parents

ST. PAUL’S PRESCHOOL IS A 4-STAR NAEYC ACCREDITED PROGRAM  

St. Paul’s Preschool received our renewed NAEYC accreditation certification in April, 2019 and it is valid until June 1, 2024.   We renewed Pennsylvania state inspection in February, 2020.

Limited spaces are available for the 2020-2021 school year. 

Call the preschool office to discuss availability.  (412) 486-5591

 

REGISTRATION FOR 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR 

Registration for the 2021-2022 school year will begin on Tuesday, November 10, 2020.  This week is reserved for our currently enrolled students and siblings of our currently enrolled students.

Tuesday, November 17, 2020, registration will begin for preschool alumni families, St. Paul’s United Methodist Church members and for families using the St. Paul’s Child Care.  

Tuesday, November 24, 2020, registration will be open to the public. 

To receive the online registration link, please call (412) 486-5591 OR email us at:  preschool.office@stpaulsumc.com. 

 

PARENT HANDBOOK 2020-2021

CHILD HEALTH FORM 2019

EMERGENCY CONTACT 2020

PERMANENT RECORD FORM 2019

The United Way

Did you know that if your employer participates in the United Way Campaign, you can designate the funds you donate to go to St. Paul’s Preschool?  Simply obtain a United Way Contributor’s Choice form from your employer and specify our preschool’s code, 941482, and the monthly or annual amount you wish to contribute.

Preschool Parent Book Exchange

We have two shelves in our Conference Room dedicated to a parent book exchange!  Please bring any books you have that might be of interest to other parents.  These can be great novels you read or interesting parenting books.  After you donate your book(s), check out the ones on the shelves donated by other parents.  You might find a special “treasure” just waiting for you!  This is a great way to recycle books and share with others.

 

PEANUT, TREE NUTS AND EGGS FREE SNACKS

In the office we have a list of commonly available snacks that are free of peanuts, tree nuts and eggs.  We invite you to stop in and take a look at this list.  You can also access the list by going to: http://snacksafety.com/snackguide.

SNACK IDEAS

Some parents have asked for suggestions on what type of snacks to bring for their child’s snack day.  Here is a list of some simple snack ideas.

Trail Mix – a mixture of whole-grain cereal, dried fruits, sunflower seeds and dried coconut flakes.  You can also add in raisins, cranberries and pretzels.

Small box of raisins

Fruit – please remember that grapes if served MUST  be cut in half.  Bananas, apple slices, berries are all good choices.

Mini bagels with cream cheese

String cheese

Yogurt tubes

Applesauce

Whole wheat pretzels and crackers

Crackers and cheese

Chips and salsa

Popcorn

Pretzels

Raisins

Carrots and ranch dip

 

BOOK SELECTIONS FOR SUMMER READING

Great Books to Read this Summer

 

by Kristen Bell and Benjamin Hart, illustrated by Daniel Wiseman

From the insanely creative Kristen Bell comes a book to inspire kids to become hard-working, kind, compassionate, thoughtful, and unique. In other words, this is a how-to-manual for Purple People, who, as everyone knows, really are the best people you can find.

by Joanna Cotler, illustrated by Harry Bliss

Saying sorry is important. It’s also really, really hard, especially when you’re in a bad mood and just want to take it out on the people around you. The good news is, you can practice and get better at it. The lesson of this charming story isn’t heavy-handed, which makes it perfect for stubborn little ones who struggle to say, “I’m Sorry” and truly mean it. Top of Form

by John Cena, illustrated by Dave Aikins

Monster trucks? Magnets? Hours of imaginative play and storytelling? Yes, please! Perfect for quiet time after a long day of playing outside, or an indoor activity on a rainy day – this activity book will fill hours of your child’s time this summer.

by Karim Shamsi Basha and Irene Latham, illustrated by Yuko Shimizu

In a time when we are all struggling to make sense of a world turned upside down, true stories of humanity and compassion become especially important. Which is why this story of Mohammad Alaa Aljaleel and his decision to feed abandoned cats in war-torn Aleppo, is a must-read this summer.

by Watty Piper, illustrated by Dan Santat

I had the original version of The Little Engine That Could and read it so often that the cover eventually fell off. For the 90th anniversary of this beloved story, Dan Santat’s vivid artwork gives fresh life to Watty Piper’s unforgettable classic and introduces a new generation to the loveable, generous, and determined blue train, who refused to let anything stop him from getting over a hill.

by Christopher Eliopoulos

As an adult, I cannot relate to the desire of children wanting to stay up as late as they can. I have forgotten the joy of sleepovers and being the only ones awake in a quiet house, which may be why this book is so much fun. Kids will love reading along to find out if two friends can outwit the YAWNS, the SNORES, and the SLEEPIES to stay up all night long!

by Vanessa Brantley Newton

Filled with poems about every type of girl you can imagine, Just Like Me is a joyous celebration of girls who play outside, and those who read all day, and those with curly hair and freckles, and those who long to explore outer space, and all those in between. Read this with a special little girl this summer and let her find the poem that speaks to who she is and who she dreams of becoming.

by Elissa Haden Guest, illustrated by Hiroe Nakata

If you have a son or a daughter who loves nothing more than watching a construction site, then this is the book for you. Babies in hardhats with shovels and bulldozers create an incredible playhouse and this book invites your child to watch the project from start to finish!

by Sophia Spencer with Margaret McNamara, illustrated by Kerascoet

Sophia Spencer is a real little girl who has loved bugs since she was two. Sophia loves bugs so much that kids at school start teasing her. Thankfully, Sophia doesn’t let that stop her. With her mother’s help, she finds scientists who encourage her, gets her own hashtag #BugsR4Girls, and even co-authors a scientific paper. Now Sophia is sharing her love of bugs with kids just in time for the excellent bug-watching season!

by Ray Jayawardhana, illustrated by Raul Colón

Even though we may feel isolated from our friends and communities, Ray Jayawardhana believes that we are all connected in ways we cannot even begin to understand. In this book, he reflects on both, the uniqueness of each person and their role in the grander scheme of things. Heady stuff, perfect bedtime reading for the lazy summer nights.

by Andrea Pippins

Even our littlest readers wonder who they will be when they grow up. Who Will You Be? gives parents and children an opportunity to discuss those dreams and to ask important questions about what growing up means and what is of utmost value to us in our lives.

by Troy Cummings

Arfy the dog was lucky enough to find his forever home and now he’s determined to find his new feline friend, Scamper, one too. Unfortunately, finding a family for this cute cat isn’t as easy as Arfy had hoped. A great story for animal lovers with wonderful insight into the importance of pet adoption.

by Jennifer K. Mann

Ernestine thinks camping sounds super fun and she’s determined to have a great time. But she didn’t realize how hard it would be to set up a tent or hike up a hill. Will Ernestine be able to overcome some unanticipated obstacles and truly enjoy her time in the woods? Maybe a s’more will help.

by Chris Grabenstein, illustrated by Leo Espinosa

I know Annalise Devin McFleece does not want to take a nap, but I, like every other adult in this adorably illustrated book, would be happy to take one for her. Which suits Annalise just fine, until she actually is tired and discovers there are no naps left!

by Helena Ku Rhee, illustrated by Pascal Campion

When Daniel has to go to work with his parents, who are night janitors, he has no idea he is about to go on a fantastic adventure. Not because the office his parents clean are magical, but because Daniel’s parents understand the value of imagination and finding the extraordinary in the ordinary. It’s a valuable lesson we all can learn.

Book recommendations from Brightly Penguin Random House

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